click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121001
20121031
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
>>> closed captioning of twbl twbl is made possible by the firemen's foundation. >>> california public schools rank lowest in the nation. >> we are a bare bones organization. we are just able to keep the lights on, the doors open and the teachers in the classrooms. >> how do tax dollars flow to public education? >> when the state goes through a budget crisis, schools are going to be in the cross hairs. >> with two competing tax measures on the november ballot, what's at stake for the state and its budget strapped schools? coming up next. >>> hello. i'm al letson, in for belva davis. welcome to a special edition of "this week in northern california." with the november election just around the corner, the campaigns are heating up for propositions 30 and 38. tonight, we want to cut through the noise and try to make sense of what really is at stake for schools if one or both or neither get the green light. we'll hear from both sides in just a few minutes. plus, get some in depth analysis from two veteran education reporters. but first, we wanted to see just how bad the budget situat
edition of "this week in northern california." with the november election just around the corner, the campaigns are heating up for propositions 30 and 38. tonight, we want to cut through the noise and try to make sense of what really is at stake for schools if one or both or neither get the green light. we'll hear from both sides in just a few minutes. plus, get some in depth analysis from two veteran education reporters. but first, we wanted to see just how bad the budget situation is in our schools. and how it got that way in the first place. pbs news hour correspondent spencer michaels takes a look. >> in schools around the state, there's a feeling that the ax is about to fall. and if and when it does, san francisco school superintendent will have to act. >> we have our doomsday plan. part of that is lopping days off of the school year. and it can be up to ten days next year. that's two weeks off of the school year. >> richard caranza says his district, though well supported by voter-passed bond measures and parcel taxes, has suffered as the state's economy tanked and, along w
>>> closed captioning of "this week in northern california" is made possible by the firemen's fund foundation. >> belva: the presidential candidates get back to the campaign trail after their first debate, with governor romney picking up some momentum. president obama returned to the golden state this weekend. there's high interest in several congressional races in the state. will california tip the scales for the control of the u.s. house? governor brown vetoes few of the more than 1,800 bills on his desk, as he presses for support of proposition 30 on the november ballot. and gas jumped as much as 20 cents overnight, with the spike expected to continue. plus, anti-domestic violence leader estra sola on making all violence an issue of global concern, coming up next. >>> good evening, i'm belva davis and welcome to "this week in northern california." on our news panel tonight, dan walters, political column nis for "the sacramento bee." in studio, we have tom vacar, computer editor for ktvu news and josh richman, regional political reporter for the bay asia news group. and joe garof
care. >> for the first time in more than three decades, california voters will decide whether or not to abolish the death penalty, and if the state's three strikes law should be reform reformed. the controversy continues over san francisco sheriff ross mirkarimi's future even after he's reinstated by the board of supervisors. >>> plus writer lynn povich and her husband, steve shepard on journalism's transition to the digital age, coming up next. >>> good evening. i'm belva davis and welcome to this week in northern california. joining me on our news panel tonight are barbara taylor, kcbs city hall reporter and scott shafer, host of the california report on kqed public radio. and carla marinucci, san francisco chronicle senior political writer. carla, there is so much going on in politics today. let's start with the vice presidential debate. people said they wanted action. what did they get? >> that's right. you could almost hear the cheers coming out of san francisco, the bars and so forth as it was going on this week. a slugfest, a political slugfest. this is what the democra
, and welcome to this week in northern california. joining us is lisa krueger, science reporter. and regional political reporter. and cory cook, political scientist. cory, let's start with you. you teach this stuff, you study this stuff. tell us, what are we seeing that is so new this year? >> i think the sheer amount of money we're talking about is new. you had in september alone both mitt romney and president obama raised the most money individually than the two candidates spent in 2004 combined. on the presidential level, we're talking about 2 or 3 billion spent for a local election, magnitudes increase over previous years. >> give us the roots. >> a lot comes from outside groups. our new campaign finance system encourages groups to spend money despite the campaigns. american crossroads is an organization started by car carl rove which allows them to runny tv commercials they want, but they also have a group gps, a non-profit dedicated to social welfare, which means they don't even have to disclose where the money comes from. half a billion right now is just from organizations. >> part of
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)